Legal Issues

Judge Reverses Opinion - Dismisses Chaco Canyon Drilling Case

 Chaco Canyon National Historic Park, Pueblo Bonito, Author: Greg Willis, from Denver, Colorado, USA, Wikimedia Commons.

Chaco Canyon National Historic Park, Pueblo Bonito, Author: Greg Willis, from Denver, Colorado, USA, Wikimedia Commons.

Judge James O. Browning has issued a memorandum opinion reversing his previous conclusion that the BLM had violated the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA).

In his decision, Judge Browning determined that the BLM had met the minimum requirements of the NHPA and dismissed the case which had been brought by Diné Citizens Against Ruining Our Environment, San Juan Citizens Alliance, WildEarth Guardians and the Natural Resources Defense Council. 

More information about this case can be found on the Cultural Property News site and Federal judge tosses lawsuit over Chaco-area drilling by Andrew Oxford published in the Santa Fe New Mexican, April 25, 2018.

 

 

Chaco Canyon Update: The BLM Failed to Comply with the National Historic Preservation Act

 Chaco Canyon National Historic Park, Pueblo Bonito, Author: Greg Willis, from Denver, Colorado, USA, Wikimedia Commons.

Chaco Canyon National Historic Park, Pueblo Bonito, Author: Greg Willis, from Denver, Colorado, USA, Wikimedia Commons.

Cultural Property News has an update on the current controversy surrounding oil and gas lease sales near Chaco Culture National Historic Park.  The U.S. District Court for the District of New Mexico has issued a preliminary order concluding that the BLM did violate the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA). 

Read the full article here ➤

 

Black Panther and Museums: the need for a genuine dialogue

A recent article on The Hopkins Exhibitionist website discusses the need for a dialogue about the complicated relationships between museums and the cultures which created the objects in their collections.  

While this article is focused on African art, we should be aware of the possible impacts on all indigenous art in museums and private collections. 

Spoiler Alert: the article does discuss the opening scene of the movie. 

The ATADA Voluntary Returns Program

An overview of the ATADA Voluntary Returns Program has been published on the ArtDaily.com website. 

If you are not familiar with the program, please visit the Voluntary Returns page on our website for an in-depth look at how it works and why we think this community based approach is the best and most efficient method for the return of sacred and ceremonial objects. 

The ATADA Voluntary Returns Program is a community-based initiative designed to bring sacred and highly valued ceremonial objects to Native American tribes. Returns take place through a consultative process in which ATADA representatives work directly with tribal community and spiritual leaders. The program evolved through the recognition by art dealers and private collectors that certain objects, although legal to own, had great importance to tribal communities, and that their return could invigorate and enhance tribal community life.

Bears Ears Opinion piece from two Native American Tribal Leaders

In an opinion piece from The Mercury News, the leaders of two Native American Tribes in California speak about the removal of protections for Bears Ears and other national monuments...

From the article:

Bears Ears was the first national monument protected at the request of tribes and is collectively managed by a commission of tribal members.
By eliminating protections for this sacred national monument, the president is saying that there’s nothing worth protecting in these lands. This is an outrageous suggestion, a slap in the face to the tribes that call Bears Ears home, and an affront to Native Americans all across the country.

Read the Full Article ➤